142. Frank Ifield – Lovesick Blues (1962)

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Seaham lifeboat made the news on 17 November when it capsized as it entered harbour. Sadly, all five crew members and four of the five survivors were killed. A week later saw the first episode of the influential BBC satirical show That Was the Week That Was. TW3, as it was also known, broke new ground with its lack of deference towards establishment figures. Although it only ran for two series, it remains one of the most important shows of all time, and a list of its stars and writers reads like a who’s who of 1960s comedy. On 29 November, an agreement was signed between Britain and France to develop the supersonic airliner that became famously known as Concorde. The week beginning 2 December saw a severe outbreak of smog in the capital, causing numerous deaths. This was the last time it caused such damage, as clean air legislation and a reduction in coal fires helped prevent it in future. Meanwhile, in the singles chart, Australian yodeller repeated the huge success of 1962’s biggest-selling single I Remember You with his manic cover of Lovesick Blues.

The music to this 1922 song came from Tin Pan Alley songwriter Cliff Friend, with lyrics from Irving Mills, and the tune, originally called I’ve Got the Lovesick Blues, was debuted in the musical Oh, Ernest. Friend had been a fighter pilot in World War One and had plenty of conversations with lovesick young men who were longing to see their sweethearts when the war was over. The first version was recorded by Elsie Clark, but one of the more notable covers came from country star Hank Williams. Williams’ producer and band thought it was a bad idea, but he gained a huge reaction whenever he performed the song live. Lovesick Blues became his first number 1, and a signature song for him. It was Northern Irish singer Ronnie Carroll who suggested Ifield should make it his follow-up to I Remember You.

Despite I Remember You being more famous, I prefer Lovesick Blues. Primarily because Ifield’s performance is a bit mad. Producer Norrie Paramor seems to have decided Ifield’s yodel had made him the star he had become, and so gave him free rein to break out into it wherever he saw fit. And he does it a lot. Ifield doesn’t sound lovesick, but he definitely doesn’t sound well. Paramor’s arrangement also echews any element of melancholy, and he ramps up the arrangement to the point it sounds like a brassy, bawdy sitcom theme. The whole thing is reminiscent of Frankie Vaughn’s unhinged Tower of Strength. I can’t imagine I’ll ever listen to it again, but I enjoyed its weirdness nonetheless.

Written by: Cliff Friend & Irving Mills

Producer: Norrie Paramor

Weeks at number 1: 5 (8 November-12 December)

Births:

Journalist Mariella Frostrup – 12 November 
Actress Maggie O’Neill – 15 November 
Footballer Alan Smith – 21 November 
Actress Samantha Bond – 27 November
Actor Colin Salmon – 6 December

2 Replies to “142. Frank Ifield – Lovesick Blues (1962)”

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