119. Elvis Presley with the Jordanaires – Surrender (1961)

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On 8 June, Prince Edward, Duke of Kent (Queen Elizabeth II’s first cousin) married Katharine Worsley at York Minster. Six days later, the Conservative government unveiled plans for a new signal-operated ‘panda’ crossing system to make the roads safer for pedestrians. The system was first introduced in April 1962, outside London’s Waterloo railway station.

During this time, Elvis Presley was back at number 1 yet again for a lengthy stint, with another European-flavoured single based on an earlier song. Surrender was based on Italian ballad Torna a Surriento, by Giambattista and Ernesto de Curtis. An English language version, called Come Back to Sorrento, had been recorded by Frank Sinatra, as well as Dean Martin, but Presley wanted a more uptempo feel, and asked for something new from his publisher, Freddy Bienstock. Bienstock gave the task to Doc Pomus and Mort Shuman, whose A Mess of Blues had made it onto the B-side of Elvis’s massive 1960 number 1, It’s Now or Never. They had also recently had a hit when the Drifters recorded their track, Save the Last Dance for Me.

Although they both shared credit for Surrender, Shuman wanted nothing to do with it, according to Pomus’s biographer Alex Halberstadt. Apparently, Shuman said ‘Why should I want to write for some redneck idiot who wants to sound like Mario Lanza? You write it Doc, you’ve already got the music.’ Pretty cutting! Pomus found it easy enough and sent off a demo to Bienstock. Elvis then recorded the track with his usual group on 30 October 1960, in the middle of a marathon session that produced his first gospel LP, His Hand in Mine.

Surrender isn’t one of Elvis’s best number 1s, but at least isn’t the previous one, Wooden Heart. It’s an average-at-best song, but as is often the case, Presley’s voice is the highlight and lifts the material. One thing these blogs have taught me is just how versatile and powerful his singing was. Whether he tried his hand at gospel, rock’n’roll or crooning, he could do it all. Surrender doesn’t even clock in at two minutes and is easy to forget. At this point, you can see why John Lennon claimed Elvis died when he joined the army. Despite the quality of the song though, it was another of Elvis’s highest-selling songs, and Pomus and Shuman would work with him again.

As Surrender‘s month at the top drew to an end, Michael Ramsey became the 100th Archbishop of Canterbury, on 27 June, succeeding Geoffrey Fisher, who had held the position since 1945.

Written by: Doc Pomus, Mort Shuman & Ernesto De Curtis

Producer: Steve Sholes

Weeks at number 1: 4 (1-28 June)

Births:

Trade union leader Bob Crow – 13 June
Singer Boy George – 14 June 
Comedian Ricky Gervais – 25 June 
Comedian Meera Syal – 27 June

Deaths:

Welsh poet Huw Menai – 28 June

101. The Everly Brothers – Cathy’s Clown (1960)

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6 May 1960 saw Princess Margaret marrying photographer Antony Armstrong-Jones at Westminster Abbey. Margaret had been in love with Peter Townsend, and he had proposed to her in 1953. However, Townsend was divorced and the wedding would have caused ructions in Cabinet, and flown in the face of Royal tradition, and in the end she turned him down. However, Margaret allegedly accepted Armstrong-Jones’s proposal the day after learning that Townsend was to marry Marie-Luce Jamagne, a young woman who bore a strong resemblance to Margaret. This was the first Royal wedding to be televised, but by 1978 they had divorced. A day later, Wolverhampton Wanderers won the FA Cup for the fourth time, defeating Blackburn Rovers 3-0 at Wembley Stadium.

Also that week, country, pop and rock’n’roll duo the Everly Brothers went to number 1 for the second time with Cathy’s Clown. Like their previous number 1, All I Have to Do is Dream/Claudette in 1958, it stayed at the top for seven weeks. Earlier in 1960 the duo had left Cadence Records and signed with Warner Bros. Records. Cathy’s Clown bore the UK catalogue number WB1, and was the first single released by the label in this country. Until this point, Warner Bros. Records had been struggling, and urgently needed a hit. The Everlys were reportedly given $1million to come up with one, and did not disappoint. Originally credited to both Don and Phil, in 1980 a deal was struck to make Don the sole songwriter. This song had been inspired by one of his ex-girlfriends, who one can only assume had dumped him, and the music was influenced by Andre Kostelanetz’s version of the orchestral Grand Canyon Suite.

Cathy’s Clown proved to be one of the most influential songs of the early 1960s, and still appears in lists of the greatest songs of all time. Coming after so many average number 1s in 1960, it’s sophistication marks it as head and shoulders above the competition. It’s all about those rolling drums and the chorus that follows. This was the first number 1 to feature a drum loop, created by engineer Bill Porter looping drummer Buddy Harman and getting him to play on top, manually adding the loop at the start of each chorus. And what a chorus. The Everly Brothers really did produce harmonies like nobody that had come before them, and the voices are just perfect on Cathy’s Clown. You can easily see the influence on the Beatles, (who at one point considered calling themselves The Foreverly Brothers), particularly on the second single, Please Please Me. The lyrics have caused confusion over the years, but to me it seems that Cathy’s clown is the singer of the song, and he’s being repeatedly made to look stupid by Cathy, who’s been cheating on him. His friends consider him a clown, but he can’t help going back for more, despite insisting in the chorus that he’s had enough. These lyrics, like the production, are a cut above your average 1960 fare. The fact it’s probably based on what happened to poor Don with his ex makes the song that bit more authentic. The Everlys did heartbreak very well – see also Bye Bye Love.

Cathy’s Clown became the first single to simultaneously hit number 1 in the US and UK, and they more than lived up to Warner Bros. Records’ expectations. Further hits and number 1s followed, making them one of the greatest acts of the early years of the 60s. The credits for the song are still contentious to this day, however. Following Phil’s death, his remaining family reasserted their rights to royalties. Don sued them to get the rights back in November 2017.

Written by: Don Everly & Phil Everly

Producer: Wesley Rose

Weeks at number 1: 7 (5 May-22 June) 

Births:

Actress Roma Downey – 6 May
Dire Straits keyboardist Guy Fletcher – 24 May
Actress Kristin Scott Thomas – 24 May
‘Chaser’ Shaun Wallace – 2 June
Actor Bradley Walsh – 4 June
Simply Red singer Mick Hucknall – 8 June
Duran Duran bassist John Taylor – 20 June 

Deaths:

Mathematician JHC Whitehead – 8 May
Politician Sir Maurice Bonham Carter – 7 June