262. The Scaffold – Lily the Pink (1968)

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Just prior to Christmas 1968, a case with tragic similarities to the murder of James Bulger in 1993 came to a close with the sentencing of 11-year-old girl Mary Bell from Newcastle upon Tyne on 17 December. In May and July that year she had murdered two young boys, one with her friend Norma Bell, who was acquitted. Bell recieved a life sentence for manslaughter. She was initially sent to the same secure unit as Jon Venables, one of Bulger’s killers. Bell was released in 1980 into anonymity.

It’s a sad irony that the number 1 of the time, and eventual Christmas number 1, was a children’s song. Lily the Pink, by Scouse comedy, poetry and music act the Scaffold, was the first novelty song to become Christmas number 1, but as detailed in Every Christmas Number 1, it was certainly not the last instance of this very British phenomenon.

The Scaffold began with the friendship of entertainer John Gorman, and musical performer Mike McCartney (younger brother of Paul). Together with poets Roger McCough and Adrian Henri they formed the revue known as the Liverpool One Fat Lady All Electric Show back in 1962.

By 1964 Henri had left and they had become the Scaffold. As they rose in popularity, McCartney changed his stage name to Mike McGear, to avoid accusations of using his brother’s name to become famous during Beatlemania. However, considering the rise in popularity of anything from Liverpool, it’s fair to say the link won’t have harmed the trio.

In 1966 they signed to Parlophone (label of the Beatles) and released their debut single 2 Days Monday, but it was their third 7″, Thank U Very Much, that first troubled the top ten. Its popularity endured into the 1980s thanks to a long-running adveritsing campaign by Cadbury’s Roses, usually at Christmas.

McGough and McGear released an eponymous album without Gorman, featuring cameos from Jimi Hendrix, Mitch Mitchell, Paul McCartney and Graham Nash, in May 1968. The Scaffold’s eponymous debut LP was released only two months later and was a live recording of mostly McGough’s poetry and McGear and Gorman’s sketches. And then came Lily the Pink.

The 1968 Christmas number 1’s origins lay in a drinking song called The Ballad of Lydia Pinkham. Pinkham was a real person, and in the 19th century she invented and marketed a herbal-alcoholic women’s tonic for menstrual and menopausal issues. She was ridiculed at the time, but the drink still exists in an altered form to this day. Versions of the ballad were doing the rounds as far back as World War 1, with lyrics poking fun at Pinkham’s drink and its alleged uses.

The Scaffold’s version had completely rewritten lyrics by McGough, Gorman and McGear, adding a cast of unusual characters to make it more child-friendly, and also in-keeping with psychedelia, with the tune sounding reminscent of the Victorian music hall. The characters they described were largely in-jokes – ‘Mr Frears has sticky out ears’ refers to Stephen Frears, who had once worked with the trio and is now one of the most highly regarded film directors in the UK. ‘Jennifer Eccles had terrible freckles’ came from the song Jennifer Eccles by the Hollies.

Speaking of which, Graham Nash provided backing vocals, along with Elton John (still Reg Dwight at the time) and Tim Rice, and that’s Jack Bruce from Cream on bass.

I remember Lily the Pink from childhood, and I enjoyed it back then. It’s bloody irritating now, though, and the in-jokes, probably only funny to the Scaffold and a few others at the time, are not funny at all now. The chorus will, sadly, stay with you forever. And ever. And then just when you think Lily has died and gone to heaven, she comes back to haunt you forevermore. The bit where the chorus comes back after she’s died is good fun though, I’ll give them that. Incidentally, it was produced by Norrie Paramor, formerly responsible for Cliff Richard and Frank Ifield. This was his 27th, and (I think) final number 1.

In 1969 the Scaffold recorded their memorable theme tune to Carla Lane’s long-running BBC sitcom The Liver Birds. The following year they were given their own children’s series, Score with the Scaffold. With the advent of decimalisation, the trio were responsible for providing tunes for a series of five-minute programmes to explain how the system would work. That same year, they teamed up with collaborator Andy Roberts (I’ve had a drink with Roberts, and he’s a bloody nice bloke with some great stories, he’s also in one of my favourite sketches of all time, here.) Vivian Stanshall and Neil Innes of the defunct Bonzo Dog Band and various waifs and strays to form Grimms.

As Grimms toured up and down the country the Scaffold continued. They had their first hit since Lily the Pink with Liverpool Lou, recorded with Wings, in 1974. Although there may have been tension after McGear left Grimms due to a bust-up with Brian Patten, the Scaffold parted amicably in 1977, although there have been brief reunions here and there since.

Following a few more singles in the early 80s, McGear retired from music, reverted to his family name and became a photographer and author. Gorman was a regular on Tiswas and the adult version OTT until the early 80s, when he moved into theatre. McGough has remained in the public eye, and is considered a national treasure thanks to his children’s poetry.

After three weeks at number 1, Lily the Pink was overtaken by the Marmalade’s cover of the Beatles’ Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da, but only a week later it returned to the top of the hit parade again for a further week.

On its last day, 14 January, Sir Matt Busby, legendary manager of Manchester United FC for 24 years, through good times and tragic times, announced his retirement.

1968 had been a particularly unusual and random year for number 1s. The decade was nearly over, and by the time we get to the end of 1969, the Beatles and Rolling Stones will have had their last number 1s.

Written by: John Gorman, Mike McGear & Roger McGough

Producer: Norrie Paramor

Weeks at number 1: 4 (11-31 December 1968, 8-14 January 1969)

Births:

Race car driver Phil Andrews – 20 December
Scottish field hockey player Pauline Robertson – 28 December
Author David Mitchell – 12 January
Scottish snooker player Stephen Hendry – 13 January 

Deaths:

Welsh poet David James Jones – 14 December
Athlete Albert Hill – 8 January
Writer Richmal Crompton – 11 January 

248. Cliff Richard – Congratulations (1968)

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Well well well, if it isn’t comeback Cliff. It had been three years since Cliff Richard’s last number 1, the tepid The Minute You’re Gone. Once Britain’s answer to Elvis Presley, he had been considered an actual danger to the country’s youth when Move It became the first rock’n’roll hit by a Brit. Around the time of his last bestseller he had been struggling with the fact he was now a practising Christian. He relented from quitting music to become a teacher, and was working out a way of being a pop star and spreading the word of the Lord.

Fortunately, he still had a loyal fanbase, who stuck with him through Beatlemania and the hippy movement. Richard was still scoring top ten hits and narrowly missed out on the Christmas number 1 in 1965 to Day Tripper/We Can Work It Out (see Every Christmas Number 2). In 1966 he had a top ten hit with Visions, and another two with the Shadows (Time Drags By, and In the Country, which is in fact ace). In 1967 he had a further three with It’s All Over, The Day I Met Marie and All My Love (Solo Tu).

Despite worries it would ruin her credibility, Sandie Shaw had become the first UK winner of Eurovision that year with Puppet on a String, and it had revistalised her career. Cliff and/or his management must have taken note, and perhaps feeling he had no ‘cool’ image left to ruin, repeating Shaw’s feat could help Richard solidify his new Christian family entertainer stylings. And so he appeared on The Cilla Black Show performing six songs that the public would then vote on, with Cliff performing the winner at the event in the Royal Albert Hall on 6 April. Like Shaw the year previous, he wasn’t best pleased with the nominated song.

Congratulations was written by Bill Martin and Phil Coulter, the duo behind Puppet on a String. Coulter presented Martin with a melody and song title, I Think I Love You. Nice tune, but Martin argued that you either loved someone or you didn’t. He looked for a five-syllable word for a new title, and there and then created a song that would be used to, well, celebrate stuff for years to come.

The ubiquitous Congratulations has been derided over the years, but praise Cliff’s Lord, it’s better than the incessantly crazed Puppet on a String. Not only that, it’s the singer’s best number 1 since he and the Shadows released Summer Holiday in 1963, shortly before the Beatles changed everything. The lyrics may be on the smug side, but nobody actually remembers anything but the song’s title, and Martin and Coulter really struck gold there, creating a memorable chorus with a theme that everyone can relate to. The oompah slow down just before the end is a bit lazy and clearly designed to appeal to European audiences, and like many pop standards, I’d be happy to never hear it again, but I can’t help but like it at the same time. Incidentally, that’s future Led Zeppelin member John Paul Jones you can hear on bass guitar.

Such was Congratulations‘ potential, the British press got fully behind Cliff, and even ran articles asking which country would come second to it at Eurovision. As you can see in the clip above, he performed on the day with gusto, beaming away and doing some unusual strutting while dressed in the outfit that inspired Mike Myers in Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery (1997). It looked certain to be two years in a row for the United Kingdom, but then Germany had the penultimate vote, and perhaps in revenge for the World Cup final two years before, they gave Spain six points. Congratulations lost out by one measly point to Massiel’s spectacularly named La, La, La.

Cliff Richard had the last laugh. La, La, La has long since been forgotten (understandable, considering the title) but Congratulations was a hit all around the continent, and became the pop star’s ninth chart-topper. It remains one of his most popular songs, and he often pulls it out of the bag for big occasions, such as outside Buckingham Palace after the Royal Wedding in 1981, and at Southampton Docks the following year when British troops returned victorious after the Falklands war, which is pretty poor taste really. It must have been pretty satisfying to knock the Beatles off their lofty perch for a change, too.

But did Cliff really lose Eurovision? In 2008 a documentary was released by Spanish filmmaker Montse Fernandez Vila that claimed Congratulations was the real winner, and there had been foul play from Francoist Spain. Richard made a meal of this in the press, saying he really wasn’t bothered as his song was better and more famous anyway, but maybe there should be a proper investigation, you know, just in case. Nothing ever came of it.

And so we say goodbye to Cliff Richard once more, as it would be another 11 years before he ruled the singles chart again. He may not have eclipsed Elvis or the Beatles, but he would outlast both. The music world would change several times over before we get round to August 1979 and We Don’t Talk Anymore.

While Congratulations held court at the top of the charts, opinion polls revealed on 11 April showed the problems with the pound had caused a dramatic slump in Labour’s popularity, with Edward Heath’s Conservatives racing ahead with more than 20 points difference. It wasn’t all plain sailing for the Tories though, as 20 April was the date of Enoch Powell’s infamous Rivers of Blood speech on immigration. His harsh rhetoric, full of foreboding on the dangers of immigration, was latched onto by racists and the Far Right. He was dismissed from the Shadow Cabinet a day later. Powell had been a popular figure in the Party, and remained so, but many believe his career suffered as a result of his speech, despite the fact many polls at the time suggested the public agreed with him. Years later, Labour’s left-wing leader in the 1980s, Michael Foot, expressed sympathy for Powell, suggesting it was ‘tragic’ that such a colourful figure had been somewhat misconstrued due to his colourful quote (pardon the pun).

Also in the news… 23 April saw the introduction of the new five and 10 pence coins in the run-up to Decimalisation.

Written by: Bill Martin & Phil Coulter

Producer: Norrie Paramor

Weeks at number 1: 2 (10-23 April)

Births:

Actress Amanda Mealing – 22 April 
Actor Ricky Groves – 23 April

 

192. Cliff Richard – The Minute You’re Gone (1965)

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Remember this guy? Cliff Richard? Biggest British pop star before the Beatles, had seven number 1s with the Shadows?

It’s often said that the Beatles and the other new groups of this era vanquished all who came before them, but it wasn’t as straightforward as that. Cliff was very much still a presence in the charts, and although his last number 1 was Summer Holiday in 1963, every song he had released since made it to the top ten.

Cliff had been a Jehovah’s Witness since 1961, but in 1964 he became an active Christian and joined evangelical group the Crusaders. This won’t have worked wonders for a rock’n’roll star at the time, but the hits continued. Not in the US though, where he could barely get noticed, save for a cover of It’s All in the Game (a UK number 1 for Tommy Edwards in 1958). His US label, Epic Records, wanted to change this, and met with Richard and his producer Norrie Paramor to sketch out plans, armed with 50 US songs to try. They picked 15, and Richard liked the idea of travelling to various American cities to record specific tracks. In Nashville, he recorded The Minute You’re Gone, which had been written by local fiddle player and singer Jimmy Gately, and became a country hit for Sonny James in 1963. The track was co-produced by Billy Sherrill, known for his work with Tammy Wynette and George Jones. Nashville-based musicians performed the backing, making Cliff’s eighth UK number 1 his first without Hank Marvin and co. The Anita Kerr singers provided backing vocals.

I was curious to hear this, wondering if it was going to be an exciting new development in the Cliff Richard sound. I should have known better. The Minute You’re Gone is a dull ballad, rendered even more bland by Richard’s safe delivery. He doesn’t exactly sound heartbroken here. Does he ever, though? The tune is very reminiscent of Ray Charles’ 1962 chart-topper I Can’t Stop Loving You, but not as good. Bring back the Shadows.

Although it brought him back to the number 1 position after two years away, The Minute You’re Gone ended a startling run of 23 consecutive top ten hits between 1960 and 1965. This is still a record for male artists, I believe. Cliff had somehow managed to make himself sound more dated than he sounded in 1963. To make things worse, he was knocked off the top by a single that made everyone look old-fashioned by comparison.

Written by: Jimmy Gately

Producer: Billy Sherrill & Bob Morgan

Weeks at number 1: 1 (15-21 April)

Deaths:

Physicist Sir Edward Victor Appleton – 21 April

153. Frank Ifield – Confessin’ (That I Love You) (1963)

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The 1963 Merseybeat marathon at the top of the charts took a brief pause that summer to allow two huge-selling artists return stints. The first was Australian yodelling country singer Frank Ifield, who prior to Merseybeat was the top music sensation. He’d had three number 1s, I Remember You and Lovesick Blues in 1962, and The Wayward Wind earlier this year, making him the first UK-based act to score three in a row.

Ifield’s schtick was to take an old song (usually a country one), make it sound (slightly) more modern, yodel as and when he saw fit, and then stick some harmonica over the top. Confessin’ (That I Love You) was more of the same, but this time Ifield was covering a jazz standard. Originally credited to Chris Smith and Sterling Grant, the song was called Lookin’ For Another Sweetie and was first recorded by Thomas ‘Fats’ Waller & His Babies in 1929. The following year it was rewritten as Confessin’, with new lyrics from Al J Neiburg and the music credited to Doc Daugherty and Ellis Reynolds.

By now, you’d think this formula would have looked stale, but Confessin’ (That I Love You) was popular enough to keep Ifield at the top one last time, for a month. It’s the least listenable of a mixed, occasionally bizarre bunch of tunes. It sounds very old-fashioned… but it’s not terrible. I’m always a sucker for some harmonica, and I love the unusual, which is probably the best way to describe Ifield’s yodelling on this song. A strange part of me enjoyed it, but I doubt I’ll be listening to it again.

By and large, the record buyers out there at the time were thinking the same thing, and Ifield became the first (and most recent) star to feel the effects of the sea change in the pop world.  Which was kind of ironic, as John Lennon admitted the Beatles used harmonica so much at the time because of Ifield. Bizarrely, both acts featured together on a cheap US compilation from Vee-Jay Records called Jolly What! England’s Greatest Recording Stars: The Beatles and Frank Ifield on Stage. The ‘copulation’, as it was accidentally called in the sleeve notes, featured Ifield hits alongside the second and third Beatles singles, plus their B-sides. Needless to say, the title was misleading, and the acts were not performing together.

Ifield’s singles started to perform badly by the middle of the decade, and he began appearing in pantomimes and faded into obscurity, eventually returning to Australia. In 1991, a bizarre dance remix of She Taught Me How to Yodel was released and credited to Frank Ifield and the Backroom Boys. I’m not sure I’ve heard the correct version, but several remixes are on YouTube, and they’re all predictably odd. Nowadays he tours Australia with  performances of his hits and memories of his years as a pop star.

This song also marked the end of an era for his producer Norrie Paramor. He had first produced a number 1 back in 1954 – Eddie Calvert’s Oh Mein Papa. Back then, the term ‘producer’ didn’t even exist. Paramor had been behind over 20 number 1s at this point. His story wasn’t over yet, but his peak years now came to an end, with George Martin taking over as the most important producer in the UK.

Written by: Al J Neiburg, Doc Daugherty & Ellis Reynolds

Producer: Norrie Paramor

Weeks at number 1: 2 (18-31 July)

Births:

Chess player Julian Hodgson – 25 July
Norman Cook, aka DJ Fatboy Slim – 31 July

149. The Shadows – Foot Tapper (1963)

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The movie Summer Holiday had been out for months, but its popularity was still very high in March 1963, leading to an unusual chart occurrence. For the second time in three months, Cliff Richard found himself knocked from the top of the charts by his backing band, the Shadows. Summer Holiday had been at number 1 for a fortnight, but Foot Tapper replaced it for a week, only to be overtaken by the film’s title track once more.

Foot Tapper was also from the film’s soundtrack, and Bruce Welch had co-written both. The Shadows final number 1 was also written by its most famous member, bespectacled guitarist Hank Marvin. It’s another uptempo piece of incidental music, in a similar vein to their previous bestseller, Dance On!.

It’s a bit better than Dance On!, but only a bit. Once more, you can imagine it working as incidental music for a film score, after all, that’s what it was. But Foot Tapper jangles along for just over two minutes and leaves little impression – it lives up to its name and that’s it. The best bit is the drum work from Brian Bennett, but compare it to Jet Harris and Tony Meehan’s Diamonds and Foot Tapper just doesn’t stand up. The Shadows had been an inspiration to many aspiring musicians, many of which would ultimately outdo and replace them, but their own well was starting to look very dry, and after backing Cliff Richard on seven number 1s, and achieving five in their own right, the group never topped the charts again.

Bassist Brian Locking left the group that October to concentrate on being a Jehovah’s Witness and was replaced with John Rostill. The hits began to dry up as Beatlemania conquered all in its path, and they starred alongside Cliff in another film, Finders Keepers. This 1966 movie features the bizarre premise of the boys arriving in a Spanish town to perform, only to find that the locals have fled in panic because a small bomb has landed nearby. So Cliff and the Shadows decide to find the bomb and get things back to normal. What a lovely set of lads. The Rolling Stones wouldn’t have done that, would they?

The 1970s began with the group featuring as regular guests on Cliff’s variety show for the BBC, It’s Cliff Richard!. Rostill left the group and sadly committed suicide in 1973, prompting yet another line-up change, and it wouldn’t be the last. The group took part in the 1975 Eurovision Song Contest, coming in second place with Let Me Be the One. Onetime guitarist John Farrar, who came and went in the mid-70s, went on to write You’re the One That I Want for John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John, one of the biggest-selling number 1s of all-time. The 80s saw keyboard thrown into the mix but like so many bands from their era, an attempt at sounding contemporary just made them look more old-fashioned. The band reunited with Cliff for live shows several times, and Hank Marvin helped on his collaboration with the Young Ones on a remake of their first number 1, Living Doll in 1986, which was the first Comic Relief single. The band’s most famous rhythm section, Jet Harris and Tony Meehan, joined them on stage in 1989 for a special performance of Move It at Cliff’s The Event show. In 2004 they announced a farewell tour, and each of the band’s line-up at the time received an OBE, but Hank Marvin gave it back (fair play). Despite the tour, they have continued to perform and record, with Singing the Blues, their last collaboration with Cliff, reaching the top 40 in 2009.

It may be easy to sneer at the Shadows in the 21st century, but if you can look past the white-than-white image and the quaint walk they would famously perform together on stage, Hank Marvin, Bruce Welch and various members ably assisted one of rock’n’roll’s biggest ever stars for years, had a hand in making some of his biggest records, became huge stars in their own right, and released Apache, one of the greatest instrumentals of all time, which would go on to influence hip-hop artists decades later. And if it wasn’t for the Shadows, there would perhaps be no Merseybeat. And after lots of teasing, we’ve finally reached that era.

Written by: Hank Marvin & Bruce Welch

Producer: Norrie Paramor

Weeks at number 1: 1 (28 March-3 April) 

 

 

147. Frank Ifield – The Wayward Wind (1963)

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Aussie-born yodelling superstar Frank Ifield’s third and penultimate number 1 was a step back from the unrestrained lunacy of Lovesick Blues. Unlike that and I Remember You, The Wayward Wind was a cover of a more recent track. Written by Stanley Lebowsky and Herb Newman, it was first recorded in 1956 by US singer Gogi Grant, who took it to number 1 in the US. The Beatles had recently featured it in their live sets of 1960 and 61, but no versions survive. By reaching number 1 once more, Ifield became the first UK-based act to have three chart-toppers in a row, and he momentarily broke up the seemingly endless Shadows-related number 1s of early 1963.

You can see why the Beatles would cover this, as you’d be forgiven for thinking it was one of their early singles at the start thanks to the earthy harmonica refrain. It’s catchy and easily the best element of the song. Then the swirling strings begin and you know this must be produced by Norrie Paramor. I’ve lost count of how many number 1s he’s been responsible for by now but it’ll be by far the most to date. However, he would soon be overtaken by George Martin. Then Ifield starts singing… I enjoyed his barmy performance of Lovesick Blues, but he misjudged this one. His overly-mannered performance is reminiscent of something ten years previous. He sounds like Frankie Laine, or Jimmy Young on his awful The Man from Laramie. It’s no surprise to see he released a version of his own in 1956.

With a title like The Wayward Wind, it’s tempting to make a joke about Ifield having some sort of stomach issue, which would possibly explain his yodelling too, but I wouldn’t do that… no, this song is about a roamer who’s left a broken heart behind. It may be Ifield’s worst number 1 yet, but you’ll be humming that harmonica part for a while afterwards.

Written by: Stanley Lebowsky & Herb Newman

Producer: Norrie Paramor

Weeks at number 1: 3 (21 February-13 March)

Births:

Politician Baron Andrew Adonis – 22 February
Actress Alex Kingston – 11 March 

145. The Shadows – Dance On! (1963)

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After three weeks at number 1 with The Next Time/Bachelor Boy, Cliff Richard found himself usurped by his own backing band. The Shadows scored their fourth chart-topper in their own right with Dance On!, a track written by sisters-in-law Valerie and Elaine Murtagh and Ray Adams. This trio were better known to the public as pop vocal group the Avons. By this point, drummer Brian Bennett and bassist Brian ‘Licorice’ Locking were firmly established as the replacements for Tony Meehan and Jet Harris respectively. Bennett had been a regular performer on Jack Good’s TV show Oh Boy! before working with Marty Wilde and then Tommy Steele. Locking performed alongside Bennett in Wilde’s Wildcats, and it was Bennett who suggested him as a replacement for Harris. Bennett and Locking brought some reliability to the Shadows, but as far as their recorded output goes, it seems they lost two vital sparks in Meehan and Harris, who were more musically adventurous. And let’s face it, you’d never consider the Shadows the most ‘dangerous’ of bands to begin with.

Dance On! is simply not in the same league as Apache or Wonderful Land, or even Kon-Tiki. It’s only two minutes long, but is so boring it feels longer. As a piece of incidental music in a 60s rock’n’roll film, it would be serviceable enough, but as a number 1 single? I can only imagine that many of Cliff’s fans would buy Shadows singles after snapping up those of their hero out of a sense of loyalty. It’s missing a killer guitar line from Hank Marvin, really. If it wasn’t ironic enough that the Shadows replaced themselves (in part) at number 1, only a week later they found themselves overtaken by their two former member, who had released a superior instrumental. Singer Kathy Kirby later released a vocal version of Dance On!, which reached number 11 in September.

As the first wintry month of 1963 drew to a close, 29 January saw President of France Charles de Gaulle veto the UK’s entry into the European Economic Community, along with Denmark, Norway and Ireland. De Gaulle was concerned that the membership of the UK would see US influence creep in.

Written by: Valerie Murtagh, Elaine Murtagh & Ray Adams

Producer: Norrie Paramor

Weeks at number 1: 1 (24-30 January)

Births

Wham! singer Andrew Ridgeley – 26 January
Journalist George Monbiot – 27 January