157. The Beatles – She Loves You (1963)

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She Loves You. Just over two minutes of guitar-based pop ecstasy, combining innovative lyrics with a simply joyous racket. It may well be the greatest song ever, let alone one of the greatest number 1s of all time. The significance of She Loves You is impossible to measure. From Ringo’s first drum roll, straight into that rapturous chorus, to the final chord, it’s just perfect.

Riding high after their first number 1, From Me to You, John and Paul began writing the follow-up on their tour bus after a concert on 26 June in Newcastle, and continued it back at their hotel, before completing it the following day at McCartney’s home. Paul originally had in mind a call-and-response song, along the lines of Bobby Rydell’s Forget Him. John said it was also Paul’s inspired idea to sing the song from the perspective of a third party. The idea of singing about someone else would eventually become an often effective way of differentiating the author of Lennon-McCartney songs – John tended to write about himself, Paul was interested in characters. The triumphant ‘yeah yeah yeah’ may have come from John, who later wondered if Elvis’s All Shook Up had given him the idea. The Everly Brothers’ Temptation may also have been an influence. The first person to hear She Loves You was McCartney’s father, Jim, when his son and John performed it on acoustic guitars. He liked it, but wasn’t happy with the use of ‘Americanisms’ – wouldn’t they rather change the words to ‘Yes, yes yes’? Understandably, this was laughed off.

Less than a week later, The Beatles assembled at Abbey Road to record this fourth single. Despite its obvious hit potential, there were some issues. Engineer Norman Smith saw the chorus lyrics on paper before hearing it, and wondered what the hell they were playing at, but soon changed his tune during the recording. George Martin thought Harrison’s suggestion to end on a major sixth chord was corny, but again, the proof was in the performance. Mixed on a two-track recording machine, in mono only, She Loves You was a primitive recording, but the instruments were mixed higher than before, creating a beefier sound.

Lyrically, She Loves You was a big step up from previous material. The lyrics detail a go-between in a love split. Some take the view that this person is envious of the girl’s love for his friend, which is an interesting theory, but one I don’t agree with. To me, it’s somebody telling a friend to sort himself out, she’s in love with him, and he should realise how lucky he is, because isn’t love amazing? It’s all there in the thrilling ‘Ooos’, re-used from From Me to You, that roll into the choruses. Obviously, Ringo’s prowess as a drummer is an argument that will never go away, but his thrashing around after that first chorus at the start is just brilliant to my ears.

Before it had even been heard, the highly-anticipated fourth single by the Beatles was always going to be a hit. Thousands had pre-ordered it way in advance of its release, before even hearing how good it was. She Loves You spent six weeks at number 1, becoming 1963’s best-seller, their biggest single and eventually, the biggest-selling single of the 60s. After four weeks at number 1, it remained in the top three until it returned to number 1 for a fortnight at the end of November, coinciding with the release of second album With the Beatles, that eclipsed Please Please Me at number 1. It was finally toppled by their next single, I Want to Hold Your Hand.

Beatlemania erupted in those last few months of the year, and She Loves You was their signature track. The song left a cultural legacy that few have ever bettered. The Beatles would go on to write better lyrics, and create more sophisticated music, continuously moving the goalposts while doing so, but if you were to try an explain to an alien or an idiot what pop music was in the 20th century, I defy you to find a more appropriate example than She Loves You.

Written by: John Lennon & Paul McCartney

Producer: George Martin

Weeks at number 1: 6 (12 September-9 October, 28 November-11 December) *BEST-SELLING SINGLE OF THE DECADE*

Births:

Pulp singer Jarvis Cocker – 19 September
Footballer David Seaman
Actress Lysette Anthony – 26 September
Ski jumper Eddie ‘the Eagle’ Edwards – 5 December

Deaths:
Motorcycle racer Peter Craven – 20 September 

103. Jimmy Jones – Good Timin’ (1960)

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One of my favourite songs by one of my favourite groups, Something Changed by Pulp is quite unlike most of the songs from their era of fame in the mid-1990s. It’s a sweet love song, that ponders on how lives can be changed forever by the timing of random events. ‘What’s this got to do with a number 1 single from 1960?’, you might ask. Well, Jimmy Jones’s Good Timin’ is similarly themed, although it fails to move me in the same way.

Good Timin’ was written by Fred Tobias and Clint Ballard Jr (manager of The Kalin Twins, and later, the writer of I’m Alive, a 1965 number 1 for The Hollies) as a follow-up to Jimmy Jones’ smash hit, Handy Man.

Jones was born in Birmingham, Alabama o  2 June 1937. He was a tap dancer before joining the doo-wop group The Berliners in 1954, before they changed their name to The Sparks of Rhythm. The group recorded the song after Jones had left them in 1956.

Now a solo artist, Jones decided to rework Handy Man with Otis Blackwell, who wrote two legendary UK number 1s, All Shook Up and Great Balls of Fire. Blackwell could do no wrong back then, and with his memorable whistle featuring on the track, it rocketed to the top three in the US and UK.

Good Timin’ has more energy than many of the number 1s of the 60s that precede it, but it’s a minor entry at best, and probably did so well off the back of Handy Man. Jones compares the timing of his relationship with that of the story of David and Goliath, pointing out that if it wasn’t for good timing, David wouldn’t have found the stone that he used to kill Goliath. Hmm, this seems a bit incongruous to me. I can’t help comparing it to Something Changed, which is unfair I know, but:

‘Do you believe that there’s someone up above/And does he have a timetable directing acts of love?’ is far more effective than:

‘If little, little David hadn’t grabbed that stone
Alyin’ there on the ground
Big Goliath might’ve stomped on him
Instead of the other way ’round’.

Ah well, Good Timin’ is more about the feel and sound I guess. Trouble is, that doesn’t do a lot for me either. Jones’s appeal lay in his falsetto, which was to be an influence on Del Shannon (of Runaway fame), but the way he sings ‘A tock, a tock, a tock, a tock’ in the chorus sounds ridiculous to these ears. Nonetheless, it was catchy enough to enjoy a three-week stint at the top.

Jones’s good timing started to run out after this song, with a few more hits troubling the charts before he faded into obscurity. He did however make the news when he sued Boy George, claiming he plagiarised Handy Man for Culture Club’s 1983 number 1 Karma Chameleon, changing ‘Come-a, come-a, come-a, come-a…’ to ‘Karma, karma, karma, karma…’. They settled out of court, with Boy George later claiming it took ’10 pence and an apple’ (according to New York Daily News‘ obituary on Jones). Jones was a fixture on the Northern Soul circuit for the last two decades of his life. He died on 2 August 2012, aged 82.

Written by: Fred Tobias & Clint Ballard Jr

Producer: Otis Blackwell

Weeks at number 1: 3 (7-27 July)

Births:

Actress Caroline Quentin – 11 July
Private Eye editor Ian Hislop – 13 July
Journalist Simon Heffer – 18 July