219. Georgie Fame and the Blue Flames – Get Away (1966)

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After coming out on top in their group, England’s World Cup winning ways continued in the knockout stages. On 23 July they defeated Argentina at Wembley Stadium thanks to a goal in the last 15 minutes from Geoff Hurst. Three days later, two goals from Bobby Charlton against Portugal, also at Wembley, saw England secure their place in the final. Their opponents were to be West Germany, who had defeated the Soviet Union 2-1 the previous day.

At number 1 that week were jazz and R’n’B group Georgie Fame and the Blue Flames. Since their previous number 1, Yeh Yeh in January 1965, the group had released three singles. In the Meantime, Like We Used to Be and Something didn’t make it into the top 20. Fame, real name Clive Powell, wrote Get Away to be used in a television advertisement for National petrol. Four years since Cliff Richard and the Shadows’ Summer Holiday, this was a more swinging, hip way of celebrating British summertime, and with the World Cup ongoing, all eyes were on England. Its release proved timely.

Set to an upbeat acoustic guitar, Fame’s gravelly but chipper vocal and chiming brass, Get Away is one of the lesser-known number 1s of the 60s, and is certainly not a classic like the recent Paperback Writer or Sunny Afternoon. That’s not to say it’s a bad track, and I’d imagine it worked very well as an advert jingle., but it rather outstays its welcome as a single. The lyric ‘Don’t mind the weather girl’ proved prescient, as although we like to imagine the summer of 66 was always glorious, in reality July was wet and dull most of the time.

Georgie Fame and the Blue Flames released two more singles that year, making the top 20 with Sunny and Sitting in the Park. They released third album Sweet Things (featuring new drummer Mitch Mitchell, only a year away from joining the Jimi Hendrix Experience) and shortly after, Fame made the decision to sign with CBS and become a solo artist. He would have one more number 1.

In the 70s, Get Away (which was also known as Getaway due to misprints on records) found further life as the theme tune to a long-running travel show in Australia called, you guessed it, Getaway.

Written by: Clive Powell

Producer: Denny Cordell

Weeks at number 1: 1 (21-27 July)

Births:

Politician Diana Johnson – 25 July 

149. The Shadows – Foot Tapper (1963)

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The movie Summer Holiday had been out for months, but its popularity was still very high in March 1963, leading to an unusual chart occurrence. For the second time in three months, Cliff Richard found himself knocked from the top of the charts by his backing band, the Shadows. Summer Holiday had been at number 1 for a fortnight, but Foot Tapper replaced it for a week, only to be overtaken by the film’s title track once more.

Foot Tapper was also from the film’s soundtrack, and Bruce Welch had co-written both. The Shadows final number 1 was also written by its most famous member, bespectacled guitarist Hank Marvin. It’s another uptempo piece of incidental music, in a similar vein to their previous bestseller, Dance On!.

It’s a bit better than Dance On!, but only a bit. Once more, you can imagine it working as incidental music for a film score, after all, that’s what it was. But Foot Tapper jangles along for just over two minutes and leaves little impression – it lives up to its name and that’s it. The best bit is the drum work from Brian Bennett, but compare it to Jet Harris and Tony Meehan’s Diamonds and Foot Tapper just doesn’t stand up. The Shadows had been an inspiration to many aspiring musicians, many of which would ultimately outdo and replace them, but their own well was starting to look very dry, and after backing Cliff Richard on seven number 1s, and achieving five in their own right, the group never topped the charts again.

Bassist Brian Locking left the group that October to concentrate on being a Jehovah’s Witness and was replaced with John Rostill. The hits began to dry up as Beatlemania conquered all in its path, and they starred alongside Cliff in another film, Finders Keepers. This 1966 movie features the bizarre premise of the boys arriving in a Spanish town to perform, only to find that the locals have fled in panic because a small bomb has landed nearby. So Cliff and the Shadows decide to find the bomb and get things back to normal. What a lovely set of lads. The Rolling Stones wouldn’t have done that, would they?

The 1970s began with the group featuring as regular guests on Cliff’s variety show for the BBC, It’s Cliff Richard!. Rostill left the group and sadly committed suicide in 1973, prompting yet another line-up change, and it wouldn’t be the last. The group took part in the 1975 Eurovision Song Contest, coming in second place with Let Me Be the One. Onetime guitarist John Farrar, who came and went in the mid-70s, went on to write You’re the One That I Want for John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John, one of the biggest-selling number 1s of all-time. The 80s saw keyboard thrown into the mix but like so many bands from their era, an attempt at sounding contemporary just made them look more old-fashioned. The band reunited with Cliff for live shows several times, and Hank Marvin helped on his collaboration with the Young Ones on a remake of their first number 1, Living Doll in 1986, which was the first Comic Relief single. The band’s most famous rhythm section, Jet Harris and Tony Meehan, joined them on stage in 1989 for a special performance of Move It at Cliff’s The Event show. In 2004 they announced a farewell tour, and each of the band’s line-up at the time received an OBE, but Hank Marvin gave it back (fair play). Despite the tour, they have continued to perform and record, with Singing the Blues, their last collaboration with Cliff, reaching the top 40 in 2009.

It may be easy to sneer at the Shadows in the 21st century, but if you can look past the white-than-white image and the quaint walk they would famously perform together on stage, Hank Marvin, Bruce Welch and various members ably assisted one of rock’n’roll’s biggest ever stars for years, had a hand in making some of his biggest records, became huge stars in their own right, and released Apache, one of the greatest instrumentals of all time, which would go on to influence hip-hop artists decades later. And if it wasn’t for the Shadows, there would perhaps be no Merseybeat. And after lots of teasing, we’ve finally reached that era.

Written by: Hank Marvin & Bruce Welch

Producer: Norrie Paramor

Weeks at number 1: 1 (28 March-3 April) 

 

 

148. Cliff Richard and the Shadows – Summer Holiday (1963)

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The Beatles came one step closer to conquering the world on 22 March when they released their debut album, Please Please Me. Their label, Parlophone Records, were keen to capitalise on the success of Love Me Do, and their follow-up single that shared the album’s title. To this day, it angers many Beatles fans that the single Please Please Me is not considered an official number 1. That’s a story for another time, however…

As one era was beginning, another was coming to an end. Summer Holiday marked the last time Cliff would make it to number 1 with the Shadows. He would continue to work with them occasionally, and obviously, further solo number 1s were to come, but the film, album and song sharing this name were the high watermark of Cliff’s career, and like Elvis, from here on in he was no longer guaranteed a number 1. He had to work for it.

Cliff’s latest film was a massive money-spinner at the box office, eventually becoming the biggest of the year. The Next Time/Bachelor Boy were both from the movie, and had been the first number 1 of 1963. The title track, written by rhythm guitarist Bruce Welch and drummer Brian Bennett, was so catchy, it must have been a shoe-in to be their next single, and two months after the film’s release, it rocketed to the top.

I’ve not been shy of criticising Cliff Richard in my blogs, because I feel he’s let me down somewhat. I was hoping some of these early chart-toppers would be similar to Move It, but too many have been bland, generic and safe. But it’s impossible to dislike Summer Holiday, even after all these years of exposure to it, on countless TV shows and adverts. You can find it amusing, sure, but in an affectionate way. How can you tire of a song that looks ahead to getting away from all your troubles, even if it is just ‘for a week or two’? The lack of edge to Cliff, Hank and co works in their favour on this track, and with its release coming straight off the back of one of the longest winters this country has ever seen, there’s no wonder the public took it to so much. It’ll probably always be considered Cliff’s best song, and is now a part of British culture, subject to countless spoofs. My first exposure to it came via Kevin the Gerbil in 1984. Kevin was the companion of 80s puppet superstar Roland Rat, and this version was one of my first ever pieces of vinyl. Summer Holiday was also interpolated into the terrible but highly amusing Holiday Rap by Dutch duo MC Miker G & DJ Sven in 1986.

After a fortnight at the top, Cliff found himself in the unlikely situation of being knocked off the top by his backing band, for the second time in a few months. More on that in the next blog.

The charts weren’t the only place in which change was coming. On 27 March, Dr Richard Beeching, the Chairman of British Railways, issued a report on drastic cuts to the rail network. This infamous report predicted the closure of over 2000 railway stations, plus the scrapping of 8000 coaches and the loss of 68,000 jobs. This was not the age of the train.

Written by: Bruce Welch & Brian Bennett

Producer: Norrie Paramor

Weeks at number 1: 3 (14-27 March, 4-10 April)

Births:

Actor Jerome Flynn – 16 March
Actor David Thewlis – 20 March
DJ Andrew Weatherall – 6 April
Musician Julian Lennon – 8 April 

Deaths:

Economist William Beveridge – 16 March